Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Lay people associated with our mission

From the Constitutions of the Sons of the Holy Family, n.48


Lay people are associated by full right with the mission of our institute because of the common grace and calling of baptism. They offer excellent support in the furtherence of the cult of the Holy Family, in the Christian formation of families, in the training of children and of the youth, in the missions, and in the apostolic undertakings of our family.

On our part, we offer them a witness of nazarene poverty and work, of simplicity and prudence, of trust in God and restraint, of charity and obedience, of patience and peace, of religious dedication and joy in the Lord while we diligently assist them in spiritual matters. We recognize and further their dignity, their prosper freedom of action, and their consequent responsibility.

SAINT JOSEPH MANYANET: Apostle of the Holy Family and of the Family, Barcelona, Spain: 1833-1901



Saint Joseph Manyanet deepen the call of God in the contemplation of the Holy Family of Nazareth. His mission was to put into practice and announce to the world the Gospel of the Holy Family. His entire life was spent in presenting God’s plan for marriage and the family and in raising children and youth able to shape healthy families, pillars of a new culture of life and love.

Jose Manyanet asserted that “paternity is similar to the priesthood”, therefore his teaching to the parents was that their lives be open to the gospel and that they teach the gospel to their children through the small events of everyday life as is shown to us in the youth years of the life of Jesus at Nazareth.

In the house of the Holy Family, Joseph Manyanet discovered the importance of the family and there learned the culture of life and love for the benefit of the children and youth, the Church and the whole society.

Joseph Manyanet was canonized by Pope John Paul II in 2004.

Saint Joseph Manyanet offers a new perspective of the Church's ministry

We offer and propose a way of life:
"A Nazareth in each Home"


"From Nazareth, Jesus teaches a simple and original way:
to be and to live as children of God, subject to Mary and Joseph,
in a family life communion, of work and serving the will
of our heavenly Father."

God gave to Joseph Manyanet a spirituality and mission to enrich the Church. He propagated them by means of his priestly ministry and the Gospel of the Holy Family.

The new perspective of the Church’s ministry is shared by the lay persons in the spirituality and mission of the sons and daughters of Saint Joseph Manyanet. From Nazareth, Jesus teaches a simple and original way: to be and to live as children of God, subject to Mary and Joseph, in a family life communion, of work and serving the will of our heavenly Father.

Upon this two pillars-- helping to grow in harmony as children of God an strengthening communion in the family-- the specific service of Saint Joseph Manyanet is put into practice for the benefit of the families and the whole Church.

In "making of each home a Nazareth" is where the spiritual family of Saint Joseph Manyanet encounters its challenge and its mission field.

History of the Holy Family Association and the Monthly Home Visit



The Holy Family Association was originally established by Pope Leo XIII with the Apostolic brief Neminem Fugit (1892). The purpose and aim of the Association was to spread the devotion of the Holy Family so as to bring families ever closer to Jesus, Mary and Joseph. Pope Pius XI assigned the religious congregation of the Sons of the Holy Family the General Secretariat of the Holy Family Association in 1928.

In the early 1920's, Fr. Salvador Gene, S.F., brought the Holy Family Association in the USA, establishing the Holy Family Monthly Home Visit in the Santa Cruz Parish, (New Mexico).

Each “Coro” (group of families) is formed by 15-30 families, which a “Celador” or “Celadora” (Custodian) appointed to be responsible for the organization of the Coro. This Custodian, with the help of all members of his/her Coro, is responsible for obtaining the Capillita, a little shrine consisting of a statue image of Jesus, Mary and Joseph enclosed in a fine finished wooden niche with a glass front. The Custodian plans a monthly schedule which enables each member family to be visited by the little shrine one or several days of the month for the family devotion.

The family recites the prayers before the little shrine thus establishing a spiritual communion with the Holy Family of Nazareth, Jesus, Mary and Joseph, and with the whole Church. Recalling the examples of Joseph as worker, Mary as Mother, and Jesus as Son, prayers are made to obtain grace to live in harmony of thought, will and action.

A special day is set in the liturgical calendar of the Church, the Feast of the Holy Family, during the Christmas season, when all the members of the Holy Family Association go to Mass to celebrate their patrons and to install new members. At this particular Mass, all the little shrines are brought to the parish as a symbol of the unity and togetherness of the families.

On the Occasion of the Feast of the Holy Family, after an Advent Retreat



Praised be the Holy Trinity 
and Jesus, Mary and Joseph!

(Date)


Reverend Pastor...........................................

On behalf of the Holy Family Association I want to thank you and congratulate you for the Holy Family Monthly Home Visit that you host in your parish. Some members of your parish attended the Advent retreat in .................................. on ......................, ....................., to pray and deepen in the Spirituality of the Holy Family. The retreat also served to reflect upon situations and family matters that deeply challenge and sometimes break the communion of the family.

During the retreat some members of the Holy Family Monthly Home Visit asked questions about the celebration of the Feast of the Holy Family and their consecration to the Holy Family. I referred them to their pastors and told them to be available to you in whatever you need to prepare the Feast of the Holy Family in your parish.

As you already know, the members of the Holy Family Monthly Home Visit consecrate themselves to the Holy Family of Nazareth. This consecration is renewed once a year on the Feast of the Holy Family.

With this letter I also send you the consecration form in order to help you prepare this special celebration for families of your parish. God bless you in your task as a Pastor and witness of the Gospel. If you have any comment or question related to the Holy Family Monthly Home Visit or the Holy Family Association, I´ll be glad to share with you the information available.

Yours, in Jesus, Mary and Joseph

Fr. Julio González, S.F.
Pastor of Holy Family Parish
& Santuario de Chimayo, NM.

On the occasion of the Feast of the Holy Family



Praised be the Holy Trinity 
and Jesus, Mary and Joseph!


Dear Pastor and Celadora of the Holy Family:

On behalf of the Holy Family Association and The Holy Family Monthly Home Visit I want to thank you and congratulate you for the Coros of the Holy Family that you and your parish host.

According to the Statutes of the Holy Family Association to be a member of The Holy Family Monthly Home Visit is a way to establish a communion of prayer and life with the members of the Coro, the Parish and the whole Church. Our Holy Father and bishops encourage us to deepen in the spirituality of the Holy Family of Nazareth and to pray together as a Family. The members of the Coro of the Holy Family consecrate themselves to the Holy Family of Nazareth, Jesus, Mary and Joseph. This consecration is renewed once a year by the Feast of the Holy Family.

Included with this letter are the consecration forms in order to help you prepare this special feast for families of your parish. God bless you in your task as a Pastor and witness of the Gospel.

If you have any comment or question related to the Holy Family Association, I’ll be glad to share with you the information available.

Yours, in Jesus, Mary and Joseph

Fr. Julio Gonzalez, S.F.
Pastor of Holy Family Parish
& Santuario de Chimayo, NM.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE CONSECRATED TO THE HOLY FAMILY?



Dear Pastor:

The consecration to the Holy Family, Jesus, Mary and Joseph, is a particular way of commitment to serve your parish and all your parishioners. Those parishioners that have asked you to help them in their consecration to the Holy Family don’t come to you with the intention of founding a new committee in your parish or to add more meetings to your agenda.

Parishioners consecrated to the Holy Family might be lectors, acolytes, ushers, extraordinary ministers of the Holy Eucharist, members of the Altar and Rosary Society, Guadalupanas, members of the prayer group, catechists, or just people longing to deepen in their family faith and traditions.

However, we share in the same spirituality: the spirituality of the Holy Family of Nazareth, Jesus, Mary and Joseph. We have come to see the house of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, as the school, the temple and the workshop where we grow together as brothers and sisters in Christ, children of God, members of the Church.

These parishioners that are requesting to be consecrated to the Family of Nazareth by the Feast of the Holy Family know that their consecration to Jesus, Mary and Joseph, is meant to pray for you and to help you and all their brothers and sisters to become what we already are in God’s heart: a family.

Following I enclose information about the consecration to the Holy Family and the Holy Family Association. Please, if you wish to have further information you can contact me:

Fr. Julio Gonzalez
Pastor of Holy Family Parish & Santuario de Chimayo
P.O. Box 235
Chimayo, NM 87522
(505) 351-4360
www.holyfamily@cybermesa.com

THE MONTHLY HOME VISIT: Mission Statement












"To deepen in the Spirituality of Nazareth
praying for one another
and through the contemplation
of the mysteries of the life of Jesus."

Prayer, Ongoing Formation and Mission of the Holy Family Association


The emotional and spiritual growth of the members of the Holy Family Association is aided by the time that we dedicate to:

- prayer
- the study of the Bible
- celebrations of the family and of the community
- assistance to other persons and families

Christian formation and education always includes these four elements: PRAYER, KNOWLEDGE, CELEBRATION and COMMITMENT.

However, there are times when we feel much more ready to participate in some activities than at other times. Hence, while some members of the Association of the Holy Family help other families by participating in projects and activities which bring solidarity, other members deepen their knowledge of the Gospel and of the spirituality of the Holy Family. To each one, however, the same Spirit and the same vocation unites and sustains the “Making a Nazareth in every home.”

The members of the Association of the Holy Family take part in the mission of the Church contributing with its own Nazarene spirituality and prayer, receiving ongoing formation and carrying out projects of solidarity with families in dire need of help.

The members of the Association of the Holy Family are united by prayer, meditation on the word of God and the contemplation on the mystery of Nazareth. They experience their identity as baptized Christians through Bible study and the traditions of the Church, and they demonstrate their vocation as sons and daughters of God by serving first their brothers and sisters (families) who most need their prayer and help. In this way, the spirituality of the Holy Family transforms an area  that is private and personal in to building a church of families where forgiveness, reconciliation and communion are stronger than the contradictions, failures, weaknesses and sins that separate us.

The Monthly Home Visit: Contemplative branch of the Holy Family Association


The Holy Family of Nazareth has entered thousands of Christian homes through the Monthly Home Visit.

The Monthly Home Visit consists in a grouping of families who form a part of the Association of the Holy Family.

The Holy Family little shrine occupies a visible place in each home where the members of the family gather to pray special devotions to Jesus, Mary and Joseph, for their own and other families, for the intentions of the members of the Association and of the Holy Father and the Holy Father.

A Contemplative Association

The members of the Monthly Home Visit form part of a contemplative group of families devoted to the Holy Family of Nazareth. They are formed in a life of prayer, of meditation and of Christian contemplation. In this way, devotion to the Holy Family will not experience the danger of being reduced to the repetition of words and private prayer.

It is not enough for a Christian to be only a person of prayer because Christian prayer is nourished in an encounter with God and with the community. To better understand the spirituality of Nazareth, the members of the Monthly Home Visit participate in Advent and Lenten retreats. They are also offered spiritual direction and workshops on prayer and on the Bible.

Coros of the Holy Family

Each group of 10, 15, or 30 families forms a coro, or society, of the Holy Family. The coros are coordinated by a person called a celadora or celador (custodian). This coordinator supervises the travel of the little shrine to all the homes in his or her care, keeps up-to-date lists of the members and informs the members and the Spiritual Director of the activities, anniversaries and deaths of the members of the coro.

The Monthly Home Visit is a fountain of vitality in the Holy Family Association because its prayer maintains watchfulness and renews all the groups and members of the Association. Because of this, the members of the Monthly Home Visit should always stay informed and learn the work of the Association, especially that which requires the deepest urgency and attention on behalf of the membership.

What is the Holy Family Monthly Home Visit?


The Holy Family Monthly Home Visit encourages the practice of the faith and family values shared by Jesus, Mary and Joseph. Those gathered in prayer around the Holy Family Chapel are guided to a deepening appreciation of their relationship within the family, their neighbor and God.

The purpose of the Monthly Home Visit is to transform each family into a Holy Family and each home into a new Nazareth. The Pilgrim Chapel journeys from one home to another through the arrangement of different groups of families. Each family keeps the Holy Family Chapel for a period of time agreed upon by the families in each group.

THE MONTHLY HOME VISIT: Celadora responsibilities


● The Celadora is responsible for the Little Chapel of the Holy Family and ensures that it travels in a timely manner from family to family each month.

● The Celadora calls the members of the Coro for all retreats, activities and feasts of the Holy Family, including Mass and receptions.

● The Celadora locates the Little Chapel when a member reports that it is running late.

● If a problem arises in the Coro, the Celadora brings up the problem with the General Celadora.

● When a member dies, the Celadora calls the family and offers them the Little Chapel.

● The Celadora brings the Little Chapel for the Feast of the Holy Family.

● The Celadora coordinates the Coro to assist for the Feast of the Holy Family, or in any other activity or retreat in which the Coro is called.

● The Celadora collects money donations from the Coro.

THE MONTHLY HOME VISIT: General Celadora responsibilities



● The General Celadora coordinates meetings, activities and retreats of the Monthly Home Visit, with the Celadoras.

● The General Celadora assists the Cela doras when situations arise that need to be solved in a Coro. May include talking to members or setting up a meeting with the Pastor.

● The General Celadora offers his/her collaboration, and of the Coros, to the Pastor for the Feast of the Holy Family.

● The General Celadora attends Parish Pastoral Council meetings on behalf of the Monthly Home Visit. Also attends national and international meetings of the Holy Family Association, as required.

● When a Coro member dies, the General Celadora helps the Celadora and Coro members to lead prayers of the Rosary for wake service, if requested by the family. The General Celadora asks Celadora to offer the Holy Family Capillita to the family for the services.

● The General Celadora informs the Pastor and the Holy Family Association when a member is very sick or dies.

THE MONTHLY HOME VISIT: Instructions for the Installation of a Coro of the Holy Family



1. Each Coro is formed by 10-30 families.

2. Among the families, a Celador or Celadora (man or woman), is appointed.
That person will be responsible for the Coro, its organization and well-being.

3. To entitle the Coro, a Patron Saint may be chosen.

4. A day, two or three days of the month is assigned to each family.

5. A list of all members, phone numbers, as well as the day assigned to each family, is attached to the little shrine, for the general knowledge of the members.

6. Upon receiving and dismissing the little shrine, the members make the Sign of the Cross, and recite the proper prayers. A candle is lit near the capillita while it visits each family.

7. Once a year, for the feast of the Holy Family, all the Coros meet together to consecrate their families to the Holy Family. All the capillitas are taken to the Chuch for Mass on that day, during which the families recite together the Prayer of Consecration.

8. All the Celadores or Celadoras take up a collection that day among the members in order to support the needs of the Holy Family Seminary. The collection is given to the General Celadora.

9. For the installation of the Coro, the Celador or Celadora will make arrangements with the General Celadora and with the Pastor of the Parish where the members of the Coro are registered.

10. When a member of the Coro dies, a Mass will be offered by the Coro. The celador/a sends a note to the General Celadora, indicating the name of the deceased member, and his/her age. A list of the deceased members will appear in the Newsletter. The members will offer themselves with the Celador or Celadora to pray the Rosary.

March, 2014

Saturday, May 4, 2013

THE MONTHLY HOME VISIT


The initial form of devotion to the Holy Family established by our first priests in New Mexico, USA, was known as The Monthly Home Visit. This consisted of a journeying statue of the Holy Family making the rounds of thirty families each month. It first began among the Indians of San Ildefonso and from there spread throughout the whole area. In time new approaches would develop regarding children and youth ministries and a truly Nazarene family life apostolate.

SANTA CRUZ DE LA CAÑADA PARISH, 1920


The whole area known as Santa Cruz de la Cañada had been without a resident priest for some time. Fr. Gené knew of the place, however, because he had previously given various missions there. The Archbishop thought it best that this little group should take charge of this very extensive parish with all its many dependent chapels scattered throughout the northern territory above Santa Fe, including a few among various Indian tribes. Having finalized the necessary transactions and received the pertinent instructions, the first Sons of the Holy Family began the last leg of their journey to Santa Cruz de la Cañada. Their arrival happened on the 24th or 25th of August, 1920.

Fr. Gené informed the Curia General in Barcelona, Spain, of his own first impressions:

“The Archbishop told us that we should take charge of the very extensive parish of Santa Cruz de la Cañada, which is an area already known to me personally because of having given missions there before. Yet I find it somewhat difficult to express my real satisfaction regarding our presence here. It is indeed a very large parish, but I retain excellent hopes of our being able to accomplish much good, not only for our Congregation, but also for the Church, for this Archdiocese, and especially for the people of God throughout the surrounding area.

The first thing we have to do is fix up the house we are to live in: we found it just with its bare walls standing. But with the help of God, everything will turn out all right. As I say, there is a large population and the parish embraces more than 20 other towns and villages, all of which depend on Santa Cruz for religious coverage.

Last, but not least, there is a garden to one side of the house. It appears to be much larger than the one we have at St. Andrew of Palomar. It has been abandoned for some time now, but I am sure it will soon be put back in proper condition.”

At the time that the Sons of the Holy Family priests took over the parish of Santa Cruz de la Cañada, it comprised the following 25 towns and villages. Within Rio Arriba County there were: Santo Niño, Española, Corral de Picosa, Guachupangue, San Pedro, Santa Clara (Indian), and a part of upper Chimayo. Within Santa Fe County there were: Santa Cruz, Nambé Pueblo (Indian), Pojoaque, San Ildefonso (Indian), El Rancho, Polvareda, Cuarteles, La Puebla, Llano, Sombrillo, Pico Chiquito, Jacona, Jaconita, Cuyamungué, Cundiyó, Córdova, Truchas and lower Chimayó.

A couple of these places, like Truchas, Córdova and Cundiyó are in mountainous areas and the few roads that existed at the time were nothing more than gully riverbeds which kept undergoing drastic changes after each torrential rain. The sole means of transportation that our first priests enjoyed were two horse buggies.

The apostolic work carried out by these missionaries Sons of the Holy Family was unpretentious but very dedicated and exemplary. Along with providing the basic and required pastoral care for each of the towns and villages within the boundaries of the extensive parish they also preached as many missions as were requested, not only within their own surrounding territory, but even outside the State of New Mexico. In the words of Fr. Gené:

“We have also accepted and preached as many missions as were requested for various and necessary reasons, but in particular to spread the devotion of the Holy Family. At each place, no matter where, one of the many sermons is to sing the praises of the Family of Nazareth Jesus, Mary and Joseph, to present this divinely constituted Family as the model of all Christian families, and to consecrate all the families of the area to the Holy Family.”

On completing their first year of apostolic work at Santa Cruz, the small community was joined by Fr. Agustín Vilalta and Bro. Andrew Solé who, on 25 August, 1921, had left their own beloved Spain aboard the steamship “Montserrat.” Fr. Gené continues the account:

“Since there was so much territory to cover, we distributed among the four of us the main towns and villages in a way that would allow us to make one or two monthly visits to each of them, according to their need and the importance of the occasion. It goes without saying that there were always services at Santa Cruz and every Sunday and holy day of obligation in the more populated towns of San Ildefonso, Pojoaque, Chimayó and Truchas. We tried to visit all the places on fixed days of the week each month by letting the people know in advance.”

During his pastoral visit in 1927, the Archbishop supported the idea of Fr. Gené and the other priests regarding the building of a parochial school in Santa Cruz. At the beginning of 1928, Fr. Gené, as pastor of Santa Cruz, petitioned the Dominican Sisters of Grand Rapids, Michigan, to teach in the parish. Upon their consent, a convent was built next to the church for them to live in.

The Sisters taught first in the public schools until 1948, at which time a parish school of some sort began to function with the full support of the parishioners and the use of different buildings for classrooms, thanks to the unrelenting efforts of Fr. Pedro Siguán. In the mid-fifties, however, after Fr. Agustín Cortés had been made pastor, he undertook the construction of a completely new school building because of the deterioration and insufficiency of the existing buildings.

With the passage of time, there was a constant increase in the overall population and new developments were beginning to spring up all around the territory. During the World War II period, there unfolded on the outskirts of the parish the now well-known government project of Los Alamos, which had a definite impact on the life and culture of the whole Española and Santa Fe areas. With the new people and the new jobs came also new challenges and needs. The time had come for larger areas to be broken up into smaller and more manageable ones, and so there began the establishment of many new independent parishes throughout the whole area.

By 1958, the parish of Santa Cruz had been left with the following missions: La Puebla, Cuarteles, El Llano, La Mesilla, San Pedro and Santo Niño. Such is its composition to this day.

FIRST IMPRESSIONS IN A NEW LAND


The circumstances which brought the Sons of the Holy Family to the Spanish-speaking and Indian missions of New Mexico are providential. Fr. Salvador Gené had been living in the mining town of Durango, Colorado, from 1913 to 1916, working with a group of Theatines out of the Sacred Heart Parish. During this time he had been covering the southeastern missions of Mora, Santa Cruz and Las Vegas: all within the State most recently admitted into the Union, that is, New Mexico (1912).

Our semi-official historian of that period, Fr. Joseph Cubells, who joined that first group of missionaries in 1929, provides us with the following account of how it came to be that we ended up in New Mexico:

“In the town of Lumberton, New Mexico, (about half-way between Chama, New Mexico, and Durango, Colorado), the pastor was a humble and holy Franciscan, Friar Albert Daeger. His sole possession was a beautiful horse, which he nobly rode on his missionary rounds to the many and distant chapels that dotted the territory. Whenever the weather would turn bad and it became impossible to continue on, Friar Albert would drop in on Fr. Gené in the most unexpected manner. More than once, with the harness over his shoulder, he could be heard entering his convent-like dwelling, yelling in a loud voice, ´Fr. Salvador, would you happen to have a place for this ´burro´that has just dropped in?´ The people were very poor and money was scarce: so much so that very often he had to reserve the Blessed Sacrament in make-believe cardboard box ´tabernacles´ in some of his so-called ´chapels´”.

One wintry afternoon, while cleaning the snow from the room of his residence in Peña Blanca, Friar Daeger was handed a confidential letter from the Apostolic Nuncio, naming him Archbishop of Santa Fe, the capital of New Mexico. It was not long thereafter that the new Archbishop remembered and contacted his good friend Fr. Gené. After several letters had crisscrossed between the new Prelate, the Superior General of our Institute, and Fr. Gené himself, the first missionary group was formed and was soon on his way to the “land of enchantment.”

As a consequence of Fr. Gené´s previous experience, Fr. Louis Tallada selected him to head this first group and appointed him to be the superior, while Father Joseph Ruensa and John Massó acted as his counselors. Brother John Martorell, who also accompanied them, would help out in whatever way was necessary.

We learn about their first reaction to the New World from the lips of Fr. Ruensa:

“On the vigil of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary, 14 August, 1920, we were able to make out the coastline of the American homeland and then, as the panorama unfolded before us, we came into full view of the imposing Statue of Liberty, and the entrance of the New York harbor, welcoming the oppressed, the burdened and the heavily laden to a land of new freedom and opportunity.”

Several days later, on 17 August, the little group of missionaries continued on their pilgrim way across this new land. Finally, on the afternoon of 20 August, they arrived in Santa Fe, tired and weary but no less for the wear and tear of their long journey. They were guests of the Franciscans at the Cathedral and there were received by the Archbishop, who explained to them his final plans regarding their continued existence and future apostolic work in the archdiocese.

FROM BARCELONA (SPAIN) TO NEW MEXICO (USA)


On July 25, 1920, the first Sons of the Holy Family embarked on their journey to the lands of North America. Here they would now establish themselves and carry out their Nazarene commitment to further the Christian formation and education of children and youth, as well as to renew Christian marriage and family life in the home through devotion to and following of the Holy Family of Nazareth Jesus, Mary and Joseph.

Gathered in the School-Novitiate House of St. Andrew of Palomar, Barcelona (Spain), a solemn celebration of the Eucharist took place with Father Salvador Gené, the superior of the new missionary group, acting as the main celebrant and assisted by his two companions, Fathers John Massó and Joseph Ruensa.

Following the Mass, there was exposition of the Blessed Sacrament with the customary prayers and then the imposition of the missioner´s cross on each member of the group by the Superior General, Father Luis Tallada. In his brief but inspiring exhortation he reminded each one of the sacred task that was being entrusted to them and of the good that would result to the Congregation and the Church because of the totally wholehearted sacrifice they were again making of their lives to the honor and glory of the Holy Family of Nazareth. He encouraged them to suffer willingly for Christ crucified all privations and hardships associated with a new life in a foreign land and to remain ever loyal and steadfast in their Nazarene dedication to the needed upbuilding of Christian family life in the home, in the school and parish, as well as in society.

Moments before leaving the official residence of the Institute, each member of the group again bade farewell to his fellow religious and lifelong companions within an atmosphere of deep “family” togetherness. They were accompanied to the Barcelonian harbor by the Superior General and a few other religious. Just before boarding the ship “Montevideo,” again they embraced in a warm, final but hope-filled farewell. Soon thereafter the ship weighed anchor and began its ocean voyage that would take them to their new destiny with God´s family in a distant land.

After arriving in New York, they continued on their pilgrim way until coming to the end of their journey: the dry and arid but enchanting lands of New Mexico.

1909-1916: ERA OF GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT


From 1909 to 1916 the Institute of the Sons of the Holy Family had entered into a new era of growth and development. There had been the new foundation in Rome, Italy, the naming of our Cardinal Protector as the President of the Association of the Holy Family, which had been entrusted to us by Leo XIII, the extension of the Feast of the Holy Family to the universal Church, and the successive foundations in both North and South America.

Friday, November 18, 2011

The Montly Home Visit of the Holy Family, by Terry Ann Lopez

The Monthly Home visit is a way through which the Holy Family of Nazareth has entered thousands of Christian homes throughout the ages. This visit is a challenge to families. It consists of a grouping of families who welcome to their homes a little shine (Capillita of the Holy Family).

This Holy Family Capillita, when enthroned in the home, occupies a visible place where the members of the family gather to pray special devotions to Jesus, Mary and Joseph, for their own and other families.

This devotion encourages the practice of the virtues of the Holy Family—Jesus, Mary and Joseph. Those members of the family who gather around the Capillita are led to a deepening appreciation of the mysteries that are made known in Nazareth in regard to Christian marriage and the family.

The purpose of the Monthly Home Visit is to transform each Christian family into a "holy family and each home into a new Nazareth."

This is accomplished by having each family receive the Holy Family Statue. The Holy Family Pilgrim Statue travels from one home to another through the arrangement of different groups or Coros of families.

HISTORY

The origin of the Monthly Home Visit is obscure. At the turn of the 19th century, it was lost amongst other devotions, but has been rediscovered and embraced by the religious Congregation of the Sons of the Holy Family, which was founded by St. Joseph Manyanet in 1864.

On June 7, 1910, Saint Pius X extended his apostolic blessing to all the families involved with the Monthly Home Visit. The Holy Father praised the efforts of the religious Sons of the Holy Family to promote and spread the devotion and imitation of the Holy Family. He appointed these religious as the permanent directors and custodians of this particular form of devotion to the Holy Family of Nazareth.

The Monthly Home Visit grew very rapidly, extending throughout Spain, Italy, Portugal, France, Holland and Belgium. In 1920, the first missionary Sons of the Holy Family brought it with them to the United States and then to Argentina, Mexico Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil.

HOLY CROSS CATHOLIC SCHOOL MONTHLY HOME VISITS

Each classroom (grade) will form a Coro at Holy Cross Catholic School. The teachers of each grade will be the Celadora (leader), who is responsible for the functioning of the group and will schedule the Monthly Home Visit for each student in her class.

Beginning the First Week of Advent, the new Church Year, the Capillitas will go home with our students, according to the Monthly Home Visit Schedule set up by the teachers (Celadoras).

Wednesday, October 5, 2011

October Assembly 2011: Presentation I, The Holy Family Association (Guideliness)

THE ASSOCIATION OF THE HOLY FAMILY

1. The vision of Saint Joseph Manyanet
    Report by Fr. Julio Gonzalez, S.F.
1.1. The Lay branch of the Sons of the Holy Family
1.2. Camareros and camareras of the Holy Family
1.3. The Holy Family Association and the Monthly Home Visit

2. The Holy Family Association at Holy Cross
    Report by Debbie Montoya (General Celadora)
    introduced by Fr. Javier Gutierrez
2.1. How many members?
2.2. Is there a program or agenda for the Monthly Home Visit
       at Holy Cross Parish? If "yes", please give details.
2.3. The Feast of the Holy Family and the Monthly Home Visit
2.4. Weaknesses and challenges of the Monthly Home Visit at Holy Cross Parish
2.5. How do you see the Monthly Home Visit at Holy Cross within the next three years?
       The same, increasing, decreasing. Please explain.
2.6. How can the Sons of the Holy Family help the Monthly Home Visit
       at Holy Cross Parish?

3. The Holy Family Association at Holy Family Parish
    Report by Emilio Martinez
3.1. How many members?
3.2. Is there a program or agenda for the Monthly Home Visit
       at Holy Family Parish? If "yes", please, give details.
3.3. The Feast of the Holy Family and the Monthly Home Visit
3.4. Weaknesses and challenges of the Monthly Home Visit at Holy Family Parish
3.5. How do you see the Monthly Home Visit at Holy Family Parish
       within the next three years? The same, increasing, decreasing. Please explain.
3.6. How can the Sons of the Holy Family help the Monthly Home Visit
       at Holy Family Parish?

4. The Holy Family Magazine
    Report by Mrs. Joanne Dupont Sandoval
4.1. Origin and goals of the The Holy Family Magazine in the USA
4.2. Finances
4.3. Weaknesses and challenges

5. The Holy Family Association in New Mexico
    Report by Fr. Julio Gonzalez, S.F.

6. Challenges and goals (OPEN DEBATE)
6.1. Is the MHV/HFA still a useful tool to evangelize families?
6.2. How can the MHV/HFA help families to grow in their faith and develop a spirituality?
6.3. Objectives for 2011-2012

Monday, October 3, 2011

The first challenge of the Holy Family Association is to present the Holy Family as a model of family and human relationships to all families and to the Church

The Church proposes the Holy Family of Nazareth as a model for all families. In the family of Nazareth we encounter the example of a man and father (Joseph), the example of a woman and mother (Mary) and the example of a son and person (Jesus).

There are different ways of fulfilling ones role in communion with others without excluding anyone; however, the harmony of the House of Nazareth does not depend on the roles of each member, but rather on the unconditional love which unites them. This love is not only human in its expression but also divine in its mystery and universality.

The life and testimony of the Holy Family is proposed for everyone without exception. Because of this, the Holy Family is not just a model for some families, but for the whole Church (a family of families).

Traditionally, the Holy Family has been proposed as the perfect model for religious communities. Thus, Jesus, Mary and Joseph accept God’s plan and they carry out this plan through perfect obedience, perfect chastity and perfect poverty. However, the Holy Family cannot be reduced to being the perfect model only for consecrated life. God makes himself present in the home of Jesus, Mary and Joseph so that all families can feel and know the nearness of God. Hence, the Church proposes the spirituality of the Holy Family to inspire families and individuals to face their questions, fears, challenges, sadness, joys and hopes of today’s families.

The first challenge of the Holy Family Association is to present the Holy Family as a model of family and human relationships to all families and to the Church. One cannot love whom one does not know and the Holy Family of Nazareth continues to be, twenty-one centuries later, a great unknown to many Christians. This is in part because of the mystery which they represent and also because we have committed the mistake of making a Holy Family of our own ideas and beliefs. Because of the temporary and finite nature of our ideas, we cannot grasp the totality and the universality of the plan of God.

In prayer before the Blessed Sacrament to pray together for vocations to priesthood and consecrated life

Next Thursday, first of the month (October 6), the entire congregation is called to unite in prayer before the Blessed Sacrament to pray together for vocations to priestly and consecrated life.

I send you three short excerpts from Pope Benedict XVI referred to the importance to nurture and share our faith:

"We live in a time characterized by relativism which permeates all life environments. Sometimes, this relativism becomes combative, directed against those who claim to know where to find the truth or the meaning of life.

Notice how this relativism exerts an increasing influence on human relationships. This is manifested in the inconsistency and discontinuity of many people and excessive individualism. Some people seem able to give up anything at all or sacrifice for others (...)

We see that in our rich Western world there are many deficiencies. Many lack the experience of the goodness of God. They don't find a point of contact with the church institutions and traditional structures. (...)

Let me address this point on the specific situation in Germany. The Church is organized optimally. But behind the structures, do we find strength of faith in a living God? We must honestly say that there is a gap between the structures and the Spirit. The real crisis of the Church in the Western world is a crisis of faith. If we do not reach a renewal of faith, any structural reform will be ineffective.

Let's go back to these people who lack the experience of the goodness of God. They need places where they can talk about their inner longing. We are called to seek new ways of evangelization, ways that might be small communities where people live the gift of friendship developing a better understanding of who they are and who they are called to be. In this small communities people can talk easily about their experiences of faith in their jobs and in their families or acquaintances. Thus they are able to witness a rapprochement of the Church to society. To them it is clear that all have need of this food of love, friendship concrete with others and with God. But it's still important to know the relationship of the Eucharist vital, because without Christ we can do nothing (cf. Jn15, 5).

From the Pope's speech to the Committee of German Catholics, September 24, 2011.

Source: Fr. Jesus Diaz Alonso, S.F.
General Superior of the Sons of the Holy Family
(Original in Spanish)

Friday, September 30, 2011

Laity: The Formation of Our Collaborators (Pastoral Plan, # 62)

We consider the integral formation of the laity that is, spiritual and doctrinal formation, growth in human values, etc., as a priority, and we include this formation in the programs of pastoral action so they:

a. discover their own vocation and availability, always growing in the course of their own mission;

b. live the communion which identifies them as members of the Church and citizens of human society;

c. share responsibilities in our ministries. We can not consider them as mere “helpers” but as partakers in the same mission, for they too are called to be agents of evangelization.

The insertion of the laity into our pastoral ministry is one of the most ambitious fruits of our ministry.

The Laity in our Pastoral Work (Pastoral Plan, # 61)

In the schools, parishes and other centers of our apostolate we count on the laity as valuable collaborators in the common mission of the Church in which we all serve.

In our schools, they can be appointed to positions of directorship, teaching, pastoral ministry, or administration, although we hold the legal representation and title to ensure fidelity to the foundational gift. The laity can also take part in the pastoral teams of our centers, with responsibilities that match their commitment.

In parishes, the laity have a relevant role in the catechesis, liturgy, charity, and above all, in the different stages of preparation for marriage and later renewal.